Anti-poaching, Community Development, Research & GIS Mapping – Tanzania

New Anti-Poaching Photos Released

April 2011, New Anti-Poaching Photos Released from the Friedkin Conservation Fund (“FCF”)

The following images show confiscation of dried bushmeat, firearms, bicycles, illegally harvested timber planks, vulture heads (used for traditional medicines), illegally grazing cattle, and poachers being arrested.

Baraka Zephania with a confiscated muzzle loader - Moyowosi

Confiscated Muzzle loader - Moyowosi

Busted meat camp - Maswa

Compounded cattle - Maswa

Timber bust - Ugalla

Disposing of confiscated timber - Ugalla

Vulture heads - Maswa

Commercial, illegal and unsustainable poaching for meat and body parts of wild animals is a problem throughout Africa.  Bushmeat is considered any animal meat which is (1) taken by illegal methods such as through use of wire snares, unregistered guns, or poison arrows; and (2) taken from unauthorized areas such as national parks, protected areas, etc.  The bushmeat is usually taken to be used for commercial trade, selling in nearby villages, or non-commercial uses like personal consumption.

Bushmeat is a crisis in Tanzania primarily because of population expansion into rural, uninhabited areas.  Species, which were previously safe, are now at risk because of an increase in illegal timber logging, charcoal production, and trespassing to illegally grazing cattle herds in natural, designated wildlife areas.

FCF takes a two-step approach in its efforts to combat the issue of bushmeat.  First, FCF works within villages located in or nearby wildlife areas to develop community projects that empower the local people to take personal ownership in and see the value of their natural resources.  Examples of these type of projects include: income generating projects like fish farming and organic honey bee keeping, school library support, student educational scholarships, bore hole well drilling, construction of schools and teacher housing, establishment of village community banks (VICOBAs), and environmental and health education, among others.  The second step is FCF’s highly effective anti-poaching work.  FCF provides the bush with eyes and ears, constantly patrolling from the air, land and water.

For more information, please visit FCF’s official website – www.friedkinfund.org or via e-mail.

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